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  1. #1
    Phero Dude
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    visit-red-300x50PNG
    I've made it to my parents

    hospital, and I feel better off here than most people right now....shatter proof windows on the third floor, back up

    generators, a broadband connection, and a cafeteria downstairs. Not too shabby if I don't say so myself.

    The

    streets were eeriely quiet on the way here. It wasn't completely empty, but I-10 east, which is usually jammed

    with traffic all day on Fridays, was clear enough to pull a 120 mph stunt on the way over here. Westbound was clear

    as well. I think everyone that had any intention of evacuating has made their way out of Houston, and are stuck in

    traffic on the outskirts if at all.

    Still worried bout my dog though.

  2. #2
    Moderator Mtnjim's Avatar
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    Default Interesting Perspective...

    And as

    usual, keep a pound of salt handy:
    " National Emergency imminent!

    Relevant URLs are at the bottom of this

    posting, along with an
    outline of the immense powers FEMA will be exercising when the
    national emergency is

    declared.

    EXECUTIVE ORDER 11051 specifies the responsibility of the
    Office of Emergency Planning and

    gives authorization to put
    all Executive Orders into effect in times of increased
    international tensions

    and economic or financial crisis.

    Rita is now heading for America's densest concentration of oil
    rigs and

    refineries off the Texas coast, and in particular
    directly for the huge refinery complex at Port Arthur. Not

    the
    eye of the hurricane mind you, but even worse: the
    north-eastern edge of the hurricane, where the strongest

    winds
    occur. As a result of Rita, which will hit late today (Friday)
    or early Saturday, we are likely to lose not

    only many of the
    refineries, but also critical pipelines to the North East, and
    many rigs that produce oil and

    natural gas. Of particular
    importance, we are likely to lose nearly all of our refineries
    that produce diesel

    fuel, and most that produce heating oil.
    With Katrina we lost rigs and, perhaps more important, there
    was

    significant damage to Louisiana ports, where most imported
    petroleum is brought into the U.S.

    Not only will

    gasoline prices soar, but we'll be critically
    short of diesel fuel for truck transport and grain harvesting
    -

    leading to a major food supply and distribution crisis. Lack
    of heating oil and natural gas will cause havoc when

    winter
    comes. With imports made more difficult by the damage in
    Louisiana, it will be difficult and expensive to

    supplement
    our crude supplies with imports, regardless of how much the
    Saudis increase their production. And even

    if we can increase
    imports, we'll be drastically short of refinery capacity.
    Furthermore, our meager emergency

    reserves of refined
    petroleum were tapped in the wake of Katrina, so there are no
    more of those available.

    All

    of this appears now to be completely unavoidable.
    Understandably, the media is focusing mostly on the threat

    to
    Houston and Galveston, and the mass exodus of residents. But
    in terms of national significance, the threat to

    our fuel
    supplies is far more important than the local devastation,
    formidable as that may be.

    Regardless of

    any pre-arranged agendas that may exist, we can
    expect a national emergency to be declared very soon, as that
    is

    what we are indeed facing. The emphasis at first may be on
    the massive refugee problem, as millions from Texas join

    the
    hundreds of thousands from New Orleans who must find
    accommodations elsewhere. There are also hundreds of

    thousands
    who have been unable to leave the Texas coastal areas - many
    of these stranded on freeways in blistering

    heat - and this
    will require massive relief efforts. The fuel crisis will also
    hit the headlines shortly after

    Rita passes as well, turning
    the situation into a perceived national emergency very
    quickly.

    This will be a

    multi-faceted emergency, drastically affecting our
    whole society, our fuel, our food, and our economy.

    I

    strongly urge everyone, wherever you are, to immediately
    stock up on non-perishable food, and whatever else you

    think
    you'll be needing, before the rush which will begin next week,
    and before price gouging and the FEMA

    takeover begin.

    good luck,
    rkm


    Relevant URLs.

    re/ Rita &

    Oil:
    http://rense.com/general67/rita.htm
    http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...home-headlines
    [url]http://money.cnn.com/2005/09/21/news/economy/rita_threat/index.htm[/ur

    l]
    http://www.fromthewilderness.com/fre...ta_storm.shtml
    http://www.cyberjournal.org/c<br /> ...&lists=newslog

    re/ FEMA:
    http://rense.com/general67/femmsec.htm

    FEMA

    powers:

    1. EXECUTIVE ORDER 10990 allows the government to take over
    all modes of transportation and control of

    highways and
    seaports.

    2. EXECUTIVE ORDER 10995 allows the government to seize and
    control the communication

    media.

    3. EXECUTIVE ORDER 10997 allows the government to take over
    all electrical power, gas, petroleum, fuels

    and minerals.

    4. EXECUTIVE ORDER 10998 allows the government to take over
    all food resources and farms.

    5.

    EXECUTIVE ORDER 11000 allows the government to mobilize
    civilians into work brigades under government

    supervision.

    6. EXECUTIVE ORDER 11001 allows the government to take over
    all health, education and welfare

    functions.

    7. EXECUTIVE ORDER 11002 designates the Postmaster General to
    operate a national registration of all

    persons.

    8. EXECUTIVE ORDER 11003 allows the government to take over
    all airports and aircraft, including

    commercial aircraft.

    9. EXECUTIVE ORDER 11004 allows the Housing and Finance
    Authority to relocate communities,

    build new housing with
    public funds, designate areas to be abandoned, and establish
    new locations for

    populations.

    10. EXECUTIVE ORDER 11005 allows the government to take over
    railroads, inland waterways and public

    storage facilities.

    11. EXECUTIVE ORDER 11051 specifies the responsibility of the
    Office of Emergency Planning

    and gives authorization to put
    all Executive Orders into effect in times of increased
    international tensions and

    economic or financial crisis.

    12. EXECUTIVE ORDER 11310 grants authority to the Department
    of Justice to enforce

    the plans set out in Executive Orders,
    to institute industrial support, to establish judicial and
    legislative

    liaison, to control all aliens, to operate penal
    and correctional institutions, and to advise and assist

    the
    President."
    Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite.
    --Lazarus Long

  3. #3
    Phero Enthusiast Netghost56's Avatar
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    Looks like I may be taking a

    hiatus from the board for a few days:


    Watches and Warnings

    Texarkana Forecast



    MILLER-CADDO-BOSSIER-WEBSTER-CLAIBORNE-LINCOLN-UNION LA-DE SOTO-
    RED

    RIVER-BIENVILLE-JACKSON-OUACHITA-SABINE LA-NATCHITOCHES-WINN-
    GRANT-CALDWELL-LA

    SALLE-BOWIE-FRANKLIN-TITUS-CAMP-MORRIS-CASS-
    WOOD-UPSHUR-MARION-SMITH-GREGG-HARRISON-CHEROKEE-RUSK-PANOLA-
    NACOGDO

    CHES-SHELBY-ANGELINA-SAN AUGUSTINE-SABINE TX-
    INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...TEXARKANA...SHREVEPORT...BOSSIER

    CITY...
    MINDEN...HOMER...RUSTON...FARMERVILLE...MANSFIELD. ..COUSHATTA...
    BIENVILLE...JONESBORO...MONROE...MANY...N

    ATCHITOCHES...
    WINNFIELD...COLFAX...COLUMBIA...JENA...CLARKSVILLE ...MT VERNON...
    MT

    PLEASANT...PITTSBURG...DAINGERFIELD...ATLANTA...QU ITMAN...
    GILMER...JEFFERSON...TYLER...LONGVIEW...MARSHALL.. .RUSK.

    ..
    HENDERSON...CARTHAGE...NACOGDOCHES...CENTER...LUFK IN...
    SAN AUGUSTINE...HEMPHILL
    423 PM CDT FRI SEP 23

    2005

    ...FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT UNTIL SATURDAY AFTERNOON...

    THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN SHREVEPORT HAS

    ISSUED A

    * FLASH FLOOD WATCH FOR NORTHWEST LOUISIANA...NORTH CENTRAL
    LOUISIANA...NORTHEAST TEXAS...EAST

    TEXAS...AND SOUTHWEST
    ARKANSAS...ALONG AND SOUTH OF A LINE FROM NEAR CLARKSVILLE
    TEXAS...TO FARMERVILLE

    LOUISIANA

    * UNTIL 4 PM SATURDAY AFTERNOON

    * HURRICANE RITA IS EXPECTED TO MOVE INLAND SATURDAY MORNING NEAR


    PORT ARTHUR TEXAS. HURRICANE RITA WILL PRODUCE HEAVY RAINFALL AS
    IT MOVES INLAND LATE TONIGHT...THROUGH SATURDAY

    NIGHT. THE
    REMNANTS OF RITA WILL MOVE NORTHWEST AND NORTH TONIGHT AND
    SATURDAY...BRINGING HEAVY RAINFALL TO

    EAST AND NORTHEAST
    TEXAS...AND PARTS OF NORTHWEST LOUISIANA...BEGINNING LATE
    TONIGHT AND CONTINUING

    SATURDAY.

    * THIS IS A VERY DANGEROUS FLASH FLOOD SITUATION. RAINFALL AMOUNTS
    FROM HURRICANE RITA WILL

    GENERALLY BE 6 TO 12 INCHES OVER
    NORTHEAST AND EAST TEXAS...AND 4 TO 8 INCHES OVER NORTHWEST
    LOUISIANA...WITH

    LOWER AMOUNTS OVER NORTH CENTRAL LOUISIANA.
    ISOLATED AMOUNTS IN EAST AND NORTHEAST TEXAS MAY APPROACH 20


    INCHES...BY THE TIME THE STORM ENDS SUNDAY OR MONDAY.

    A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS THAT CONDITIONS MAY DEVELOP THAT

    LEAD
    TO FLASH FLOODING. FLASH FLOODING IS A VERY DANGEROUS SITUATION.

    YOU SHOULD MONITOR LATER FORECASTS AND BE

    PREPARED TO TAKE ACTION
    SHOULD FLASH FLOOD WARNINGS BE ISSUED.

    They're finally starting to get prepared up

    here. Several gas stations have gone empty, long lines in town, there's a rush at Walmart.
    We drew up about 20

    gallons of water, some for drinking and the rest for other. I'll use what rainwater I catch to keep the chickens

    going, gotta go take the fiberglass panels off the roof of the pen before they blow away. It's already a little

    breezy, much nicer than the stagnant heat we've been having.

    We can see the cloud bands outside right now. It's

    cool but very eerie. I did what my aunt did- take pictures of all our furniture and my computer stuff ( )

    for insurance reasons . Our house is raised on blocks and it's all wood so I'm not too sure it can handle a steady

    50mph wind with 80mph gusts.

    I've decided to pack up my best clothes and family photos and take them over to my

    grandmothers, since she lives in a cinderblock house. We may end up staying over there if it gets too bad.



  4. #4
    Phero Pro NaughtieGirl's Avatar
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    Netghost, I don't know

    exactly where you are, but my thoughts are with you. Keep us posted as long as you have power? Then again (speaking

    from experience from this neck of the woods) a power outage is more than likely, and not necessarily a reason for

    concern. I know exactly what you mean about the trees though.

    You sound like you really know what you're

    doing. I almost wrote "and I have the fullest confidence you'll be fine" but that is presumptuous.

    I don't

    know if I wrote this before or if I thought of posting it and didn't get around to it: I know who I would want to

    be with in a disaster situation!

    Are the chickens finally laying yet? If not - Just eat them! Now's a good

    time!
    Treasure Every Moment that you have
    Yesterday is History - Tomorrow is a Mystery
    Today is a Gift - That's why It's called the Present!
    (Unknown source)

  5. #5
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    NetGhost, good luck -

    you may need it - predicting 2 feet of water up your way
    There is a cure for electile dysfuntion!!!!

  6. #6
    Phero Enthusiast Netghost56's Avatar
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    2 feet of water is almost

    worth it- our pond has lost almost 20 feet with this drought we've had.

    No the chickens aren't laying yet- we

    butchered 4 Tues and 4 Weds. We've been eating chicken for months Got probably 40 pounds in the freezer, and

    I moved this grill I modified over to my grandmother's backporch today. I took a cheap grill and chopped the legs

    off, and added a table on the side. We'll be able to use it when the power's out. Bought a bag of charcoal.



    Naughtie: Thanks. You wouldn't believe that I'm 23, do you?

    I'm in SW Arkansas, in the east center of the

    "notch". I'm 45 miles northnortheast of Texarkana.

    Talk about the good Lord providing- I went to the dump today

    and found 2 pairs of dirty but intact chainsaw chaps, and an 8 foot retractable umbrella with a bent rod. They will

    be a great help.

    I've been out snapping photos- we've been getting some incredible cloud formations- you can

    actually see bands of the hurricane. This one band filled the sky, it started out yellow and by the time it was on

    the horizon with the sun, it was unbelieveably a deep fuschia. I also saw a B52 bomber flying north, out of

    Barksdale AFB in Shreveport for sure. Didn't have the camera though.

    The weather outside is very pleasant

    right now, but like my grandmother says- the calm before the storm.

    There's talk of tornadoes, but there's no

    way to protect against them, so that's the only fear. We're high and dry for floods, being on hills. My driveway

    will flood and might cut us off, but we'll be parking the vehicles on the northern hills, which is near the

    highway.

    I think we have about 20 gallons of water, and I have enough buckets set up to catch 42 gallons of

    rainwater. That should give us a week.

    I wonder about my friend in Texarkana, I might call him later and see

    what he's doing. He'll probably leave and come down here to his parents for the weekend, which he does often.



    Oh and we also have 7 gallons of gasoline in containers, since there's hardly any left in town.

  7. #7
    Phero Dude
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    Quote Originally Posted by Netghost56
    2 feet of water

    is almost worth it- our pond has lost almost 20 feet with this drought we've had.

    No the chickens aren't

    laying yet- we butchered 4 Tues and 4 Weds. We've been eating chicken for months Got probably 40 pounds in

    the freezer, and I moved this grill I modified over to my grandmother's backporch today. I took a cheap grill and

    chopped the legs off, and added a table on the side. We'll be able to use it when the power's out. Bought a bag of

    charcoal.

    Naughtie: Thanks. You wouldn't believe that I'm 23, do you?

    I'm in SW Arkansas, in the east

    center of the "notch". I'm 45 miles northnortheast of Texarkana.

    Talk about the good Lord providing- I went to

    the dump today and found 2 pairs of dirty but intact chainsaw chaps, and an 8 foot retractable umbrella with a bent

    rod. They will be a great help.

    I've been out snapping photos- we've been getting some incredible cloud

    formations- you can actually see bands of the hurricane. This one band filled the sky, it started out yellow and by

    the time it was on the horizon with the sun, it was unbelieveably a deep fuschia. I also saw a B52 bomber flying

    north, out of Barksdale AFB in Shreveport for sure. Didn't have the camera though.

    The weather outside is very

    pleasant right now, but like my grandmother says- the calm before the storm.

    There's talk of tornadoes, but

    there's no way to protect against them, so that's the only fear. We're high and dry for floods, being on hills.

    My driveway will flood and might cut us off, but we'll be parking the vehicles on the northern hills, which is near

    the highway.

    I think we have about 20 gallons of water, and I have enough buckets set up to catch 42 gallons of

    rainwater. That should give us a week.

    I wonder about my friend in Texarkana, I might call him later and see

    what he's doing. He'll probably leave and come down here to his parents for the weekend, which he does often.



    Oh and we also have 7 gallons of gasoline in containers, since there's hardly any left in town.
    Wow.

    Well good luck anyway man. I sure got lucky, since I live on the west end of town and Rita made a last minute shift

    eastward while downgrading the a category 3. Damage to our area was no worse than a bad thunderstorm. A few broken

    limbs and leaves everywhere, but everything else seems fine.

    I'm sitting at home right now. Electricity

    running, water running, and my dog, who got picked up by my uncle yesterday, is doing fine. So yeah I feel blessed.



    I just had an unexpected vacation from work and school. sweet.

  8. #8
    Phero Pro NaughtieGirl's Avatar
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    Hi Netghost,


    Your

    last post was on 9/23 and it's now 9/25 so I'm assuming you did lose power. Aren't you glad it's not winter yet!

    Looking forward to hearing from you!
    Treasure Every Moment that you have
    Yesterday is History - Tomorrow is a Mystery
    Today is a Gift - That's why It's called the Present!
    (Unknown source)

  9. #9
    Phero Enthusiast Netghost56's Avatar
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    No, we didn't lose power, I

    just took advantage of the weather to get alot of things done outside. I was so tired yesterday I went straight to

    bed and slept til 11 today.

    To tell you the truth, I was kinda disappointed. We did get rain- it started about 1

    pm yesterday and kept up steadily until after midnight- however we only got a few inches. I was out most of today

    picking up small limbs and light debris. We got some pretty strong gust (up to 30 mph) in the afternoon, and

    apparently some at night. Suprisingly, no trees down here, and it doesn't look like any in the area at all. I was

    hoping for a few trees to fall so I could get a jumpstart on firewood, but no luck.
    I'll be heading into town

    tomorrow for feed, so I'll look around. Texarkana and Shreveport got the brunt of it. They showed lots of trees

    down but very little flooding. We've just been so dry here for so long that all the rivers and lakes are too low to

    flood.

    On the up side I did fill up all my rainwater buckets- got enough to bathe in- so when it dries up again

    I won't run up a water bill at my grandmother's.

    We'll be going to Texarkana Tues for groceries and meds, so

    I'll check out the damage there. In the end it's gonna be the gas that causes us the most grief. I don't know

    what the current price is in town, but after the weekend its probably scarce here and everywhere.

  10. #10
    Phero Dude
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    Quote Originally Posted by Netghost56
    No, we didn't

    lose power, I just took advantage of the weather to get alot of things done outside. I was so tired yesterday I went

    straight to bed and slept til 11 today.

    To tell you the truth, I was kinda disappointed. We did get rain- it

    started about 1 pm yesterday and kept up steadily until after midnight- however we only got a few inches. I was out

    most of today picking up small limbs and light debris. We got some pretty strong gust (up to 30 mph) in the

    afternoon, and apparently some at night. Suprisingly, no trees down here, and it doesn't look like any in the area

    at all. I was hoping for a few trees to fall so I could get a jumpstart on firewood, but no luck.
    I'll be heading

    into town tomorrow for feed, so I'll look around. Texarkana and Shreveport got the brunt of it. They showed lots of

    trees down but very little flooding. We've just been so dry here for so long that all the rivers and lakes are too

    low to flood.

    On the up side I did fill up all my rainwater buckets- got enough to bathe in- so when it dries

    up again I won't run up a water bill at my grandmother's.

    We'll be going to Texarkana Tues for groceries and

    meds, so I'll check out the damage there. In the end it's gonna be the gas that causes us the most grief. I don't

    know what the current price is in town, but after the weekend its probably scarce here and everywhere.


    Glad you're ok man.

    The part of the Houston Area that was adversely affected was the eastern portion, and

    that's primarily where all the oil refineries and chemical plants reside...not to mention the oil rigs and what not

    that got taken out in the gulf. Gas prices are going to soar.

    I'm fine with paying an extra 30 bucks for gas a

    week. It sucks, but what else can you do right?..just gotta tighten the budget a bit.

    What worries me about

    gas prices though, and this was a topic that was brought up at a risk management society luncheon i was at earlier

    this week, is how the effects of high gas prices trickles down the economy and adversely affects everyone else.

    Sharp increases in the price of gas (doubling in less than a month) means increases in the cost of shipping

    inventory and raw materials. That translates down the line into increases in prices of various products at the

    retail level, or forces companies to look to other means to make up the revenue lost to increase shipping/production

    costs. If that means a company has to lay off workers (in extreme cases), or downsize products, thats how its going

    to go down.

    We also have a potential increase in insurance rates, which admittedly was expected to be much worse

    when Rita was headed towards the heart of downtown houston. A lot of insurance companies were forced to dump their

    reserves to cover the damages their clients recieved in Katrina, and now whatever comes from Rita. Increased

    insurance expenses could trickle its way down the economy as well.

    Those are the projections anyway. We won't

    know how badly this hurricane will affect things until we have a better idea of how much damage was done out here,

    and how long itll take to recover.

  11. #11
    Phero Enthusiast Netghost56's Avatar
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    Well, I said after Katrina

    that the effects will spread like wildfire all over the country, and that it could signal a change in the way things

    are run. But the fact is that everyone will be affected. In one way or another.

  12. #12
    Phero Dude
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    Quote Originally Posted by Netghost56
    Well, I said

    after Katrina that the effects will spread like wildfire all over the country, and that it could signal a change in

    the way things are run. But the fact is that everyone will be affected. In one way or another.


    Definately. While I don't think the effects will be permanent (these things can be rebuilt afterall) it will,

    like you said, affect everyone.

  13. #13
    Doctor of Scentology DrSmellThis's Avatar
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    I'm happy all of you are OK!

    Hope the rest of hurricane season is reasonably kind to us.
    DrSmellThis (creator of P H E R O S)

  14. #14
    Phero Dude
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrSmellThis
    I'm happy all

    of you are OK! Hope the rest of hurricane season is reasonably kind to us.
    Only two more months. What

    are the odds that two major hurricanes will find their way to the gulf. *knock on wood.

  15. #15
    Phero Enthusiast Netghost56's Avatar
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    I got my pictures in today. I

    put this one together, it's 2048x600, so it might take a while for you to load:



    [img]http://img101.imagevenue.com/loc7

    6/th_519_hurricane.jpg[/img]


    I didn't quite capture the grandure of the actual scene, but you can kinda

    make out the bands. The upper band went from the west to the north, all the way across my horizon. It would've

    taken 5 pictures to cover the whole thing! I haven't seen any hurricane pictures, so I can't compare.

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